Category Archives: Productivity and Innovation Credit

Income Tax – Sole proprietor convicted for PIC sham


It was reported in IRAS’ website on 3 August 2018 that Lim
Mei Lee, who is a sole proprietor of Wahla Balloon, has been convicted and sentenced for abusing the Productivity and Innovation Credit (“PIC“) scheme by giving false information to illegally obtain PIC cash payouts and bonuses for Wahla Balloon.

Investigations by IRAS revealed that Lim gave false information to the Comptroller of Income Tax (“CIT“) by stating in Wahla Balloon’s PIC application forms that the business had incurred qualifying PIC expenditure when no such expenditure had been incurred.

The forms were submitted between November 2013 to July 2014 to claim $11,953.80 in PIC cash payouts and $13,269 in PIC bonuses for the purported expenditure of $19,923 to purchase items such as balloon inflators and to attend balloon making workshops.

Lim thus committed an offense by giving false information to illegally obtain PIC cash payouts and bonuses that she was not entitled to.

Lim faced a total of 8 charges of giving false information to the CIT to illegally obtain PIC cash payouts and bonuses. She pleaded guilty to 3 proceeded charges, involving a total amount of PIC cash payouts and bonuses of $13,204.60, with the other 5 remaining charges being taken into consideration for the purposes of sentencing. The Court ordered Lim to pay a fine of $9,000 and a penalty of $26,409.20, 2X the amount of cash payouts and bonuses illegally obtained, and sentenced her to 23 weeks’ imprisonment in default of payment.

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Income Tax – Wholesale Trader and Company to Pay Penalties of $169,194.60 and Fine of $5,000 for False PIC Claim


It was reported in IRAS’ website on 21 July 2017 that Chin Jin Han (“Chin“), who was running a wholesale trading company, Mah Sing Pte. Ltd (“Mah Sing”), has been convicted of providing false information in the company’s Productivity and Innovation Credit (“PIC”) cash payout application form.

Chin submitted a PIC cash payout application form to IRAS, under Mah Sing’s name, in Apr 2013. He obtained the signature of Mah Sing’s sole director, his mother-in-law who left the running of the business to him, and completed all the required fields in the PIC cash payout application form.

IRAS’ Investigations revealed that Mah Sing did not purchase the two servers and three workstations (“the equipment”) at the purported cost of $93,997, as declared in the PIC cash payout application form. The invoices that showed the purchase of the equipment were false.

Both Mah Sing and Chin were convicted of giving false information to the Comptroller of Income Tax, in order to obtain a PIC cash payout and Bonus which the company was not entitled to.

The court ordered the company to pay a penalty of $56,398.20 which is a one-time penalty of the amount of the PIC cash payout that was wrongfully claimed.

Chin was convicted of giving false information to the Comptroller of Income Tax to assist Mah Sing to obtain a PIC cash payout, which Mah Sing was not entitled to when no such purchase had in fact taken place. The court ordered Chin Jin Han to pay a penalty of $112,796.40, which is two times the amount of PIC cash payout that was wrongfully claimed, and a fine of $5,000.

What does this mean to you?

IRAS takes a serious view of any attempt by claimants, vendors or consultants to defraud the Government. Under the Income Tax Act, anyone convicted of an offence of abusing the PIC scheme will have to pay a penalty of up to four times the amount of PIC cash payout fraudulently obtained or which would have been obtained if the offence had not been detected, and a fine of up to $50,000 and/or imprisonment of up to five years.

If you have any questions, contact support@whm-consulting.com.

Income Tax – Director Behind PIC Sham Convicted


It was reported in IRAS’ website on 20 July 2017 that Selladorai Dharmalingam (“Selladorai”), the sole director of Al Bright Construction Pte. Ltd. (“Al Bright”), has been convicted and sentenced for abusing the Productivity and Innovation Credit (PIC) scheme by giving false information to illegally obtain a PIC cash payout and bonus for Al Bright.

IRAS’ investigation revealed that Selladorai authorized the submission of the PIC Cash Payout Application Form by Al Bright to claim $50,461.20 in PIC cash payout and $15,000 in PIC bonus, for the purported expenditure of $84,102 to purchase an electric overhead crane.  However, there was no such expenditure incurred by Al Bright nor any such equipment was purchased.

Selladorai was convicted of giving false information to the Comptroller of Income Tax in order to obtain a PIC cash payout and PIC bonus which the company Al Bright was not entitled to. The court ordered Selladorai to pay a fine of $3,500 and a penalty of $100,922.40, twice the amount of PIC cash payout that Al Bright had wrongfully obtained, and sentenced him to 12 weeks’ imprisonment in default of payment.

What does this mean to you?

IRAS takes a serious view of any attempt by claimants, vendors or consultants to defraud the Government. Offenders convicted of PIC fraud will have to pay a penalty of up to four times the amount of cash payout fraudulently obtained, or which would have been obtained if the offence had not been detected, and a fine of up to $50,000 and/or imprisonment of up to five years.

If you have any questions, contact us at support@whm-consulting.com.

Income Tax – Robotic Ice-Cream Machine Dealer Convicted of False PIC Claim


It was reported in IRAS’ website on 27 April 2017 that
Robofusion Asia Pte Ltd (“Robofusion”) has been convicted of giving false information in the Productivity and Innovation Credit (“PIC“) cash payout application form.  Its director, Yong Tai Kok (“Yong“) has also been convicted of his role in assisting Robofusion in making the false PIC Claim.

IRAS’ investigation

IRAS’ Investigations revealed that Yong obtained the consent of two other people who were not employees of Robofusion, to use their names in Robofusion’s PIC cash payout application form dated 23 May 2013.  Robofusion made CPF contributions to their Central Provident Fund accounts in order to represent them as Robofusion’s local employees when in fact they were not.

Robofusion’s PIC cash payout application was for the purchase of “Robofusion Generation 4 Ice Cream Kiosk” costing $93,000 on 28 Feb 2013 and “Software License and Implementation for Cashless Payment System and Kiosk Payment Integration” costing $14,980 on 29 Apr 2013. The amount of PIC cash payout which was wrongfully obtained was $60,000.

Eventually … 

The court ordered Robofusion to pay a penalty of $60,000 for the PIC cash payout that it was not entitled to.

Yong was convicted of intentionally aiding Robofusion to, without reasonable excuse, give false information to the Comptroller of Income Tax to obtain a PIC cash payout which the company was not entitled to.  The court ordered Yong to pay a penalty of $120,000, which is twice the amount of PIC cash payout that was wrongfully claimed and a fine of $4,000.

If you have any questions, please contact support@whm-consulting.com

Income Tax – 14 Individuals Were Charged in Court for False PIC Claims


It was reported in the IRAS’ website that 14 individuals who allegedly made false Productivity and Innovation Credit (“PIC”) claims were charged will be charged in court on Friday, 17 Feb 2017. These individuals had registered sole-proprietorships, partnerships or companies and used them to make false claims. Their PIC claims amounting to $334,464 were made between 2013 and 2014.

Investigations by IRAS have revealed that the PIC claims were linked to S. Chandran, who was charged in court on 27 Jan 2017 for assisting 49 claimants to fraudulently obtain PIC cash payouts and PIC bonuses.  IRAS has taken appropriate legal action against these claimants based on the facts and circumstances of each case, including prosecution or other enforcement actions such as the issuance of warning letters.

What does this mean to you?

IRAS takes a serious view of any attempt by claimants, vendors or promoters who abuse the PIC scheme and defraud the Government. In particular, IRAS will take stern action against promoters who facilitate offenses committed against the PIC schemes. Anyone who commits PIC offenses might be subject to penalties of up to four times the amount of PIC cash payout and PIC bonus fraudulently obtained (or which would have been obtained if the offense had not been detected), and a fine of up to $50,000 or imprisonment of up to five years.

If you have any questions, please contact support @whm-consulting.com.